[Answer] As mentioned in the lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a rampart is a what?

[Answer] As mentioned in the lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a rampart is a what?

“The Star-Spangled Banner” started as a poem, written by Francis Scott Key during the War of 1812. The stanzas recount the British attack on Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore in 1814. It’s a song you have heard countless times – and you can probably recite it by heart. But do you know what the words mean? The line “Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro’ the perilous fight, O’er the ramparts we watch’d, were so gallantly streaming” suggests that the stars and stripes of the US flag could be seen over the ramparts despite the bombardment of the British warships. A rampart is a barricade built to protect a castle or fort, such as Fort McHenry in this case.

As mentioned in the lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a rampart is a what?

Barricade

[Ans] As mentioned in the lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a rampart is a what?

Before 1931, other songs served as the hymns of U.S. officialdom. “Hail, Columbia” served this purpose at official functions for most of the 19th century. “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee“, whose melody is identical to “God Save the Queen“, the United Kingdom’s national anthem,[3] also served as a de facto national anthem.[4] Following the War of 1812 and subsequent U.S. wars, other songs emerged to compete for popularity at public events, among them “America the Beautiful“, which itself was being considered before 1931 as a candidate to become the national anthem of the United States.[5]

Because Key and Skinner had heard details of the plans for the attack on Baltimore, they were held captive until after the battle, first aboard HMS Surprise and later back on HMS Minden. After the bombardment, certain British gunboats attempted to slip past the fort and effect a landing in a cove to the west of it, but they were turned away by fire from nearby Fort Covington, the city’s last line of defense.[citation needed]

 

As mentioned in the lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” a rampart is a what?

“The Star-Spangled Banner” started as a poem, written by Francis Scott Key during the War of 1812. The stanzas recount the British attack on Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore in 1814. It’s a song you have heard countless times – and you can probably recite it by heart. But do you know what the words mean?

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